First Alert Weather Alert: Flood Warning expires at 10:03 PM on 4/23, issued at 10:03 PM Fort White, FL | Lake City, FL | Lulu, FL

Another Day of Heavy Rain... Potential Late Week Flooding... Ok. Tornado Upgraded to Massive EF-5... Rip Current Awareness Week

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Updated: 6/05/2013 12:16 am

Another round of heavy rain & storms Tue.  More than 3" in 1 hour in Arlington...2.55" in Dixie Union, Ga....0.50" in Jax Beach for a 2-day total of 3"...0.66" in Fleming Island for a 2-day total of 1.95".  More heavy rain will develop Wed. from the middle of the day through the afternoon with the strongest storms dumping 1-3" in a short time.  Photos below:
* Josh King, Dixie Union, Ga. - pecan tree snapped at the base by strong winds
* Stan - Flooding at Atlantic Blvd/S'side Blvd.
* David Groover, Neptune Beach - classic shelf cloud at the leading of an intense t'storm
* Michelle Jovel, Atl. Blvd., Intracoastal - roll cloud on the leading edge of a t'storm

So the focus shifts to the potential tropical or subtropical development in the Gulf of Mexico.  The system continues to be seriously hindered by dry mid & upper level air to immediate west/northwest of the low as well as westerly shear.  While these conditions may lessen some late Wed.-Thu., it should not be soon enough or substantial enough to allow for a major tropical system.  Having said that...the low could still become subtropical or tropical storm "Andrea" before landfall near the Fl. Big Bend +/- 100 miles or so Thu. night-early Fri.  Such a track will not be good for the First Coast despite the lack of overall intensity of the system.  We'll be in the east quadrant that is loaded with tropical moisture that will potentially dump some very heavy rain over Jax, NE Fl. & SE Ga.  The right quadrant will also be prone to storms that might rotate producing brief isolated tornadoes.  So plan on a wet & stormy few days ahead.  Click ** here ** to go "Talking the Tropics With Mike".  Radar imagery below courtesy S. Fl. Water Management District.

Review of mobile doppler data + a more detailed damage survey helped the Norman N.W.S. determine that the El Reno tornado was not only a violent EF-5 but also a whopping 2.5+ miles across!  Their update: (click here for more info.)
PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT...
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE NORMAN OK
1206 PM CDT TUE JUN 4 2013

...UPDATE ON MAY 31 EL RENO TORNADO...

METEOROLOGISTS WITH THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE AND RESEARCHERS FROM THE UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA AND THE CENTER FOR SEVERE WEATHER RESEARCH CONTINUE TO INVESTIGATE INFORMATION RELATED TO THE MAY 31 EL RENO TORNADO.

WITH THIS INVESTIGATION... THE TORNADO HAS BEEN UPGRADED TO AN EF5 TORNADO BASED ON VELOCITY DATA FROM THE RESEARCH MOBILE RADAR DATA FROM THE UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA RAXPOL RADAR AND THE DOPPLER ON
WHEELS RADARS FROM THE CENTER FOR SEVERE WEATHER RESEARCH. IN ADDITION... THE WIDTH OF TORNADO WAS MEASURED BY THE MOBILE RADAR DATA TO BE 2.6 MILES AFTER THE TORNADO PASSED EAST OF US HIGHWAY 81
SOUTH OF EL RENO. THIS WIDTH IS THE WIDTH OF THE TORNADO ITSELF AND DOES NOT INCLUDE THE DAMAGING STRAIGHT-LINE WINDS NEAR THE TORNADO AS DETERMINED BY THE HIGH-RESOLUTION MOBILE RADAR DATA. THE 2.6 MILE TORNADO PATH WIDTH IS BELIEVED TO BE THE WIDEST TORNADO ON RECORD IN THE UNITED STATES.

EL RENO TORNADO

RATING:                  EF5
PATH LENGTH /STATUTE/:   16.2 MILES
PATH WIDTH /MAXIMUM/:    2.6 MILES
FATALITIES:              N/A
INJURIES:                N/A

START DATE:              MAY 31 2013
START TIME:              6:03 PM CDT
START LOCATION:          8.3 WSW OF EL RENO /CANADIAN COUNTY /OK
                           NEAR COURTNEY ROAD ABOUT 1 MILE NORTH
                           OF REUTER ROAD
START LAT/LON:           35.495 / -98.095

END DATE:                MAY 31 2013
END TIME:                6:43 PM CDT
END LOCATION:            6.2 ESE OF EL RENO /CANADIAN COUNTY /OK
                           NEAR INTERSTATE 40 AND BANNER ROAD
END LAT/LON:             35.502 / -97.848

This week is "Rip Current Awareness Week".  Click ** here ** for more info. from our Jax N.W.S.  The key to surviving rip currents is to not panic.  Remember the typical rip current is little more than 20 yards wide, so the current will eventually "let go".  Once it does, swim parallel to the coast (so as not to swim & move back into the current) then come ashore.  The best advice is to never swim or surf alone & always near a lifeguard.

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