First Alert Weather Alert: Flood Warning expires at 10:04 PM on 4/24, issued at 10:04 PM Blackshear, GA | Bristol, GA | Mershon, GA | Millwood, GA

Rain Totals & Photos... Iowa May Snow!... "Earth Gauge": Air Quality, Arctic Warming, Plants

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Updated: 5/04/2013 12:42 am

A tropical storm-like Nor'easter is not quite yet done with the First Coast.  More rain will develop Sat. along with scattered t'storms.  More heavy rain is possible, but the rain should move through faster keeping amounts from getting way out of hand.  Still...with the ground saturated...there could be some short term flooding.  Brighter, warmer & drier Sunday before a secondary disturbance triggers a few afternoon showers & storms Monday.  Big warm up & drier for later in the week.

Our Jax N.W.S. has posted a summary of this heavy rainfal event -- click ** here **.  The maps below are courtesy the N.W.S. -- the first one shows doppler estimated rainfall....the 2nd shows the surface weather map (the low to the south helped produce the heavy rain)....the 3rd is the drought monitor & shows why flooding wasn't even worse -- soils were dry across the area.  The list below is rainfall thru early Fri. (not included is a report of 9.66" just NW of St. Augustine!):
PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT...COR
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE JACKSONVILLE FL
1000 AM EDT FRI MAY 3 2013

...LATEST 24 HOUR PRECIPITATION REPORTS...

.LOCATION...                                   TIME           AMT
ST AUGUSTINE AIRPORT (ST. JOHNS FL)         758 AM MAY 3     8.29 IN
4 WNW BAYARD (DUVAL FL) (COCORAHS)          700 AM MAY 3     6.98 IN
1 SW SAWGRASS (ST. JOHNS FL) (COCORAHS)     700 AM MAY 3     6.92 IN
3 W BAYARD (DUVAL FL) (7 FT)(COCORAHS)      700 AM MAY 3     6.30 IN
3 WNW ORANGE MILLS (PUTNAM FL)              700 AM MAY 3     5.92 IN
2 W PALM COAST (FLAGLER FL) (COCORAHS)      700 AM MAY 3     5.25 IN
WASHINGTON OAKS STATE GARDENS               730 AM MAY 3     5.10 IN
1 NNW SAN PABLO (DUVAL FL) (COCORAHS)       700 AM MAY 3     4.63 IN
1 NNW SAN PABLO (DUVAL FL) (COCORAHS)       800 AM MAY 3     4.54 IN
6 W LAKESIDE (CLAY FL) (COCORAHS)           700 AM MAY 3     4.41 IN
1 S LAKE GENEVA (CLAY FL) (COCORAHS)        700 AM MAY 3     4.33 IN
1 N LAKESIDE (CLAY FL) (COCORAHS)           600 AM MAY 3     4.17 IN
3 SE ORTEGA (DUVAL FL) (22 FT)(ASOS)        753 AM MAY 3     4.11 IN
1 SSE ARLINGTON (DUVAL FL) (COCORAHS)       700 AM MAY 3     4.10 IN
STARKE (BRADFORD FL) (172 FT)(COOP)         800 AM MAY 3     4.10 IN
CRAIG MUNICIPAL AIRPORT (DUVAL FL)          753 AM MAY 3     3.70 IN
2 ENE TALLYRAND (DUVAL FL) (COCORAHS)       700 AM MAY 3     3.50 IN
2 SSW HIGH POINT (CAMDEN GA) (RAWS)         712 AM MAY 3     3.38 IN
1 ESE STARKE (BRADFORD FL) (COCORAHS)       720 AM MAY 3     3.13 IN
WATER PLT (PUTNAM FL) (55 FT)(COOP)         810 AM MAY 3     3.10 IN
2 ENE JACKSONVILLE HEIGH (DUVAL FL)         400 AM MAY 3     3.08 IN
1 SSW MOSS BLUFF (MARION FL) (COCORAHS)     700 AM MAY 3     2.97 IN
1 WNW ORTEGA (DUVAL FL) (COCORAHS)          600 AM MAY 3     2.87 IN
2 SSE SATSUMA (PUTNAM FL) (COCORAHS)        700 AM MAY 3     2.78 IN
5 NE GAINESVILLE AIRPOR (ALACHUA FL)        600 AM MAY 3     2.69 IN
WOODBINE (CAMDEN GA) (18 FT)(COOP)          804 AM MAY 3     2.63 IN
3 NNE OCEANWAY (DUVAL FL) (COCORAHS)        800 AM MAY 3     2.51 IN
6 S RATLIFF (DUVAL FL) (COCORAHS)           600 AM MAY 3     2.47 IN
4 W TALBOT ISLAND (DUVAL FL) (COCORAHS)     700 AM MAY 3     2.32 IN
GAINESVILLE REGIONAL AIRPORT                753 AM MAY 3     2.18 IN
JACKSONVILLE, FL (DUVAL FL) (ASOS)          756 AM MAY 3     2.13 IN
3 SW HIGH SPRINGS (ALACHUA FL)              735 AM MAY 3     2.05 IN
EDDY TOWER RAWS (BAKER FL) (GOES)           804 AM MAY 3     1.89 IN
10 SW FOLKSTON (CHARLTON GA) (RAWS)         756 AM MAY 3     1.77 IN
BELL 4WNW (GILCHRIST FL) (35 FT)(COOP)      705 AM MAY 3     1.70 IN
HIGH SPRINGS (ALACHUA FL) (65 FT)(COOP)     700 AM MAY 3     1.70 IN
5 NW SALT SPRINGS (MARION FL) (RAWS)        704 AM MAY 3     1.52 IN
OLUSTEE RAWS (BAKER FL) (175 FT)(GOES)      704 AM MAY 3     1.49 IN
4 ESE HICKOX (BRANTLEY GA) (COCORAHS)       700 AM MAY 3     1.42 IN
STEVEN FOSTER STATE PARK (CHARLTON GA)      805 AM MAY 3     1.26 IN
JONES ISLAND (CHARLTON GA) (GOES)           801 AM MAY 3     1.20 IN
2 W DEENWOOD (WARE GA) (136 FT)(RAWS)       704 AM MAY 3     1.05 IN
5 NNW WHITE SPRINGS (HAMILTON FL)           630 AM MAY 3     1.03 IN
3 SE OCALA (MARION FL) (COCORAHS)           700 AM MAY 3     0.91 IN
DIV FORESTRY (COLUMBIA FL) (COOP)           700 AM MAY 3     0.90 IN
3 NNE LAKE WEIR (MARION FL) (COCORAHS)      530 AM MAY 3     0.85 IN
ORANGE SPRINGS 2SSW (MARION FL) (COOP)      800 AM MAY 3     0.67 IN
HOMERVILLE 5N (CLINCH GA) (COOP)            600 AM MAY 3     0.63 IN
5 ESE SUWANNEE RIVER STATION                700 AM MAY 3     0.63 IN
WTR TR PLT (HAMILTON FL) (147 FT)(COOP)     605 AM MAY 3     0.52 IN
PATTERSON (PIERCE GA) (105 FT)(COOP)        800 AM MAY 3     0.40 IN
3 N FLEMINGTON (MARION FL) (COCORAHS)       700 AM MAY 3     0.40 IN
2 NNW LAKE WEIR (MARION FL) (COCORAHS)      700 AM MAY 3     0.39 IN
3 SSE SUMMERFIELD (MARION FL)               700 AM MAY 3     0.36 IN
BACON COUNTY AIRPORT (BACON GA) (ASOS)      753 AM MAY 3     0.33 IN
4 SW BAXLEY (APPLING GA) (194 FT)(RAWS)     804 AM MAY 3     0.33 IN
4 W DOCTORTOWN (WAYNE GA) (COCORAHS)        630 AM MAY 3     0.30 IN
6 NE ODUM (WAYNE GA) (127 FT)(COCORAHS)     700 AM MAY 3     0.29 IN
PRIDGEN (COFFEE GA) (300 FT)(COOP)          540 AM MAY 3     0.26 IN
5 NW DOCTORTOWN (WAYNE GA) (COCORAHS)       600 AM MAY 3     0.26 IN
NAHUNTA 6NE (BRANTLEY GA) (68 FT)(COOP)     700 AM MAY 3     0.25 IN
2 ENE SCREVEN (WAYNE GA) (COCORAHS)         800 AM MAY 3     0.25 IN
BAXLEY 5NNW (APPLING GA) (213 FT)(COOP)     800 AM MAY 3     0.23 IN
HAZLEHURST (JEFF DAVIS GA) (COOP)           800 AM MAY 3     0.21 IN
5 ESE THALMANN (GLYNN GA) (13 FT)(RAWS)     804 AM MAY 3     0.12 IN
LUMBER CITY (JEFF DAVIS GA) (GOES)          745 AM MAY 3     0.12 IN
MALCOLM MC KINNON AIRPORT (GLYNN GA)        753 AM MAY 3     0.11 IN

Photos below are from Janet Sparks along a tributary of Black Creek in Clay Co...& Molly Gilmer showing the rough seas/surf. 

Meanwhile...a freak May winter storm hit the midwest.  The photo below is from my dad in Tama, Ia -- May 3rd snow!.  The second photo is from a H.S. classmate -- Todd Cooper -- where snow was even heavier in Arlington.

Earth Gauge: Air Aware
Air Quality Awareness Week takes place from April 29-May 3, 2013. This year, learn more about how air quality affects your health. And, find out what you can do to protect air quality where you live.

• Air quality is important at every age. Are you at risk for health problems from ozone (sometimes called smog) and particle pollution? Children, people with asthma or another lung disease, healthy adults who are active outdoors, people with cardiovascular disease and people middle-aged and older may be at increased risk. Learn more about the health risks you may face.
• Air pollution isn’t just a big city problem. Poor air quality can be a problem in suburban and rural areas, too. Learn more about how ozone and particle pollution form.
• The Air Quality Index (AQI) helps you plan outdoor activities. Visit airnow.gov or listen to the local weather forecast to check the AQI in your area and plan accordingly. If the ozone air quality forecast is code orange tomorrow and you plan to exercise outside, reduce the health risks by running in the early morning, when ozone levels are likely to be lower. Learn more about checking the AQI and planning outdoor activity.
• Schools can help protect kids from poor air quality. The School Flag Program alerts parents, teachers and coaches to the AQI forecast, allowing them to adjust outdoor activities or move them inside on days when the air might not be healthy. Children and teenagers are at increased risk from air pollution: their lungs are still developing and they are more likely to have asthma. They are also more likely to be active outdoors, and they breathe in more air per pound of body weight than adults do.
• You can help protect air quality where you live. Saving energy at home, tuning up your car, taking public transit and filling your gas tank in the evening are easy ways get started. Learn more about reducing your contribution to air pollution.

Learn more about how weather impacts air quality.

Air Quality Awareness Week is a joint initiative of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

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Climate Fact: Rising Temperatures are Greening the Arctic

Over time, as the world’s average temperature has climbed, Northern Hemisphere plants in boreal and Arctic regions have benefited from these warmer conditions.  A NASA-funded study conducted by an international team of 21 scientists recently discovered that the annual temperature profiles and plant productivity rates once found at lower latitudes have shifted north by 4 to 7 degrees latitude in just 30 years.  In other words, the Arctic landscape looks much “greener” than it did 30 years ago over an area that’s nearly equivalent in size to the United States (9 million square kilometers) if it were stretched out like a rubber band and wrapped around the top of the globe.  Additionally, this study found that the Arctic is greening at an increasing rate as its temperatures continue to rise, impacting when plants bloom in the spring, die in the fall and how well they photosynthesize in between.  This study and another published around the same time both expect these trends to continue.

(Sources: Liang Xu et al. 2013, “Temperature and vegetation seasonality diminishment over northern lands,” Nature Climate Change, doi:10.1038/nclimate1836; Richard G. Pearson et al. 2013, “Shifts in Arctic vegetation and associated feedbacks under climate change,” Nature Climate Change, doi:10.1038/nclimate1858.)

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Climate in the News: “Plants Moderate Climate Warming” – ScienceDaily, April 28, 2013 – As temperatures warm, plants release gases that help form clouds and cool the atmosphere. Understanding this negative feedback loop could help improve climate models.

Have a great & safe weekend!

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