Former Congresswoman Corrine Brown to be released from home confinement

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. — Former Jacksonville-area Congresswoman Corrine Brown will be released from home confinement pending an appeal of her conviction on 18 federal charges connected to a fraud scheme.

During a morning hearing, Federal Magistrate Judge James Klindt ruled that Brown can travel outside the district but must remain in the Continental United States. The judge stated that Brown is not likely to flee and is not likely a danger to the community. A $50,000 bond exists, but Brown does not have to post the money. She must continue to have no contact with the co-conspirators.

Brown was convicted in 2017 of 18 charges connected to the fraud, which involved soliciting hundreds of thousands of dollars to a sham charity organization and using the money for personal expenses and lavish events instead.

She was released from federal prison in April of this year due to coronavirus concerns. Pastor Kelvin Cobaris, who accompanied Brown when she first surrendered at Federal Corrections Institution Coleman in January 2018, told Action News Jax at the time that Brown was on her way back home to Jacksonville to carry out the remainder of her sentence.

Brown is appealing her conviction, and a date for that appeal hasn’t been set. In September, the 11th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals vacated an earlier decision by a three-judge panel, and agreed to rehear the case in full court.

This is a developing story, refresh for updates throughout the day.

Hannah Lee

Hannah Lee

Hannah Lee is a General Assignment Reporter for 104.5 WOKV.