WATCH State of the Union 2020: Surprises, no handshake, a torn-up speech, live updates, livestream

VIDEO: State of the Union no handshake, a torn-up speech

President Donald Trump delivered the State of the Union address Tuesday, a day before U.S. senators are set to vote on whether to convict or acquit him on two articles of impeachment.

Trump gave the speech in the chamber where in December the House voted to impeach him on charges of abuse of power and obstruction of Congress.

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House Speaker Nancy Pelosi was seen tearing up her copy of the speech after Trump had finished speaking.

Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer gave the Democratic response to the president’s speech. Whitmer highlighted “what Democrats are doing," as she talked about health care and infrastructure repairs.

See live updates from the speech below.


Live updates

The White House calls out Pelosi

Here is part of the Democratic response

Pelosi rips up the speech

The Democratic response

10:30 p.m. ET Feb. 4, 2020: The Democratic response to speech will begin in a few minutes.

It’s over

10:26 p.m. ET Feb. 4, 2020: After nearly 90 minutes, Trump ends with “The best is yet to come.”

He did not mention impeachment. He did not mention the Iowa caucus.

He is being congratulated as he leaves the chamber with phrases like, “You nailed it."

Home from deployment

10:20 p.m. ET Feb. 4, 2020: Trump surprises a military wife and two children by bringing her husband, who was deployed in the Middle East, home and to the Capitol.

Chants of “USA, USA” go up.

Earlier in the evening, Trump surprised a 4th-grader with a scholarship to the school of her choice in Philadelphia.

Remembering Kayla

10:17 p.m. ET Feb. 4, 2020: Carl and Marsha Mueller from Arizona are in the gallery.

Their daughter, Kayla, an aid worker, was kidnapped, tortured and killed by Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi. Al-Baghdadi was killed in a raid last year by American special forces. The code name for the raid was 8-14, Kayla’s birthday.

2nd Amendment

10:09 p.m. ET Feb. 4, 2020: “As long as I am president I will defend your right to keep and bear arms.”

He lost two

10 p.m. ET Feb. 4, 2020: Rep. Tim Ryan and Rep. Jackie Speier have left the building.

Family leave, internet access, sanctuary cities

9:57 p.m. ET Feb. 4, 2020: Everyone cheers paid family leave extension and access to high-speed internet for everyone.

Democrats boo as Trump talks about sanctuary cities and “radical politicians” who pass and support sanctuary city laws. Trump introduces the brother of a man who was killed by an undocumented alien.

Trump mentions legislation that will allow the family of anyone killed by an undocumented alien in a sanctuary city to sue that city.

“If you come illegally, you will be promptly removed from our country,” Trump adds a bit later.

Banning late-term abortions

9:55 p.m. ET Feb. 4, 2020: Trump vows to ban late-term abortions.

Acknowledging Rush

9:52 p.m. ET Feb. 4, 2020: Trump acknowledges Rush Limbaugh in the audience. Limbaugh told his listeners Monday that he has been diagnosed with advanced lung cancer.

He then tells Limbaugh he will be receiving the Presidential Medal of Freedom -- right now.

He has the first lady give him the medal in the House gallery. Limbaugh seems stunned at what has happened and is tearing up.

Ending AIDs

9:49 p.m. ET Feb. 4, 2020: Trump promises to end AIDS by the end of the decade.

Health care

9:43 p.m. ET Feb. 4, 2020: Trump: "A good life for American families also requires the most affordable, innovative, and high-quality healthcare system on earth. … I made an ironclad promise to Americans, we will always protect patients with pre-existing conditions. ...

"We will also protect your Medicare and your Social Security.

“We will never let socialism destroy American healthcare," says Trump as he appears to take a swipe at Democratic candidates running for president and their Medicare for all plans.

A teen and his great-grandfather

9:39 p.m. ET Feb. 4, 2020: As he mentions Space Force, Trump recognizes a 13-year-old boy, Iain Lanphier, who wants to be an astronaut. The boy’s great-grandfather, a 100-year-old Tuskegee Airman, is recognized and gets a standing ovation.

Iain Lanphier’s grandfather, Charles McGee, salutes the Congress.

Guaido is in attendance

9:30 p.m. ET Feb. 4, 2020: Venezuelan opposition leader Juan Guaido is recognized by Trump.

He calls Guaido the real leader of Venezuela. He adds, “Socialism destroys nations.”

On trade

9:28 p.m. ET Feb. 4, 2020: Trump said on trade:

"Many politicians came and went, pledging to change or replace NAFTA — only to do absolutely nothing. But unlike so many who came before me, I KEEP MY PROMISES. Six days ago, I replaced NAFTA and signed the brand new U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement into law. ...

“Days ago, we signed the groundbreaking new agreement with China that will defend our workers, protect our intellectual property, bring billions of dollars into our treasury, and open vast new markets for products made and grown right here in the USA. ...”

The designated survivor

9:23 p.m. ET Feb. 4, 2020: Interior Secretary David Bernhardt has been named the designated survivor for the State of the Union address.

The designated survivor is the person who does not attend the speech in case something should happen at the Capitol and the president, vice-president, House speaker and Senate leader should be killed or incapacitated.

It’s the economy

9:20 p.m. ET Feb. 4, 2020: Trump is listing the economic accomplishments of his administration -- unemployment, growth in investments, 401-Ks, and Opportunity Zones.

Except for Opportunity Zones, he is being booed by Democrats. Republicans are standing as one to cheer.

He says he and the people in the room have gotten criminal justice reform done and everyone is cheering.

Cheers and boos

9:14 p.m. ET Feb. 4, 2020: Trump touts the unemployment rate, says it was lower than the rate during the previous administration.

He is booed by Democrats when he says his administration reversed the Obama administration policies.

Moving forward

9:10 p.m. ET Feb. 4, 2020: “We are moving forward at a pace that was only unimaginable a short time ago and we are never, ever going.”

“The state of the union is sound,” Trump says.

Trump is entering the House Chamber, no handshake with Pelosi

9:04 p.m ET Feb. 4, 2020: Trump is coming into the House Chamber, shaking hands with senators and representatives along the way.

They are wishing him luck and he is saying “thank you.”

He greets the Supreme Court justices and the Joint Chiefs of Staff. A cheer of “Four more years” goes up.

He does not shake the outstretched hand of Nancy Pelosi.

First lady, Cabinet members are in the Chamber

8:59 p.m. ET Feb. 4, 2020: Melania Trump is being seated. She is sitting next to Rush Limbaugh.

Cabinet members are being seated now.

The Supreme Court is coming in

8:55 p.m. ET Feb. 4, 2020: The justices of the U.S. Supreme Court enter the chamber and are applauded. Chief Justice John Roberts has been presiding over Trump’s impeachment trial.

Awaiting Trump

8:50 p.m. ET Feb. 4, 2020: Everyone is standing, awaiting Trump’s arrival and talking with each other. They are being very loud.

The House impeachment managers are seated next to each other.

Wearing white

8:48 p.m. ET Feb. 4, 2020: Many of the women in the chamber are dressed in white in solidarity with all women.

Finding their seats

8:40 p.m. ET Feb. 4, 2020: The senators and representatives are making their way to their seats. The speech is held in the House chamber which is larger than the Senate chamber.

Trump’s family members are seated in the gallery.

Leaving the White House

8:36 p.m. ET Feb. 4, 2020: The president and first lady are leaving the White House for the Capitol. At the Capitol, Vice President Mike Pence is making his way to his seat which is behind the president as he delivers the speech.

Pelosi, dressed in white, is in her seat, as well. It, too, is behind the president as he speaks.

The Trump family on the way to the State of the Union

Seeing Pelosi for the first time in a while

8:31 p.m. ET Feb. 4, 2020: According to House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, she and the president have not spoken since October.

Closer to war than we thought

8:20 p.m. ET Feb. 4, 2020: According to media reports, Trump told TV anchors at a luncheon today that the U.S. and Iran were closer to war then anyone knew just months ago. Trump is expected to talk about national security tonight.

The Spanish-language response

8:09 p.m. ET Feb. 4, 2020: Rep. Veronica Escobar, D-Texas, will deliver the Democrats’ Spanish-language rebuttal tonight.

Some more guests

7:50 p.m. ET Feb. 4, 2020: Here are some more guests the president and first lady invited.

Rush will be a guest

7:42 p.m. ET Feb. 4, 2020: Conservative radio host Rush Limbaugh will be the president’s guest tonight at the State of the Union address. On Monday, Limbaugh told his listeners that he was diagnosed with advanced lung cancer.

State of the Union begins soon

7:30 p.m. ET Feb. 4, 2020: Good evening and welcome to live updates from the State of the Union address. The speech begins at 9 p.m. ET

FILE - In this Feb. 5, 2019, file photo, President Donald Trump delivers his State of the Union address to a joint session of Congress on Capitol Hill in Washington, as Vice President Mike Pence and Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., watch. Two decades ago, President Bill Clinton delivered his State of the Union address before a nation transfixed by his impeachment. He didn’t use the I-word once. President Donald Trump is far from the first president to deliver a State of the Union address in a time of turmoil.
FILE - In this Feb. 5, 2019, file photo, President Donald Trump delivers his State of the Union address to a joint session of Congress on Capitol Hill in Washington, as Vice President Mike Pence and Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., watch. Two decades ago, President Bill Clinton delivered his State of the Union address before a nation transfixed by his impeachment. He didn’t use the I-word once. President Donald Trump is far from the first president to deliver a State of the Union address in a time of turmoil. (Andrew Harnik/AP)