Rep. Corrine Brown served federal subpoena

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JACKSONVILLE, Fla. —

Federal investigators are now looking into the actions of Rep. Corrine Brown.

Action News Jax sources said Brown was served with a subpoena while eating dinner at a local restaurant.

Mincy Pollock said he was at a dinner meeting with Rep. Corrinne Brown Monday at a Northside Bono's when the congresswoman was served with a federal subpoena.

“Two white guys in suits show up, it was a bit odd,” Pollock said.

“As we were sitting there, the guys came in, it was calm. They introduced themselves as agents and gave her some paperwork.” Pollock said. “They asked if it was a good time to talk, she says no. I’m busy.” 

“It was very calm for the most part. She was wondering, did they follow me,” Pollock said.

Brown is already battling in federal court over the plans to re-draw her congressional district.

In a statement released Wednesday, Brown said:


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"The 5th congressional district is under attack through the redistricting process, and now it is under siege by other political forces. It is not surprising that every time we go through the redistricting process some tangential investigation comes up. I want to assure my constituents that these unfounded and politically motivated actions will not distract me from my critical work of ensuring that the federal resources and rights of the citizens of the 5th congressional district are being protected."

While her office won't say what the subpoena is for, local leaders who spoke with Action News Jax said they think it could be about her quick picks. 

Every election Brown hands out quick picks to her constituents telling them who she is endorsing. 

Action News Jax spoke to one former candidate Wednesday who described his encounter with Brown's quick picks. 

Dick Kravitz ran for tax collector in 2011 and lost. He said he went to Brown asking for support. 

Kravitz said Brown and an aid explained that if Brown offered her support, Kravitz would have to pay for printing costs either $10,000 or $15,000. 

Kravitz said he left to consider it, and then realized the math did not add up, so he never went back for the endorsement.


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