UF Health Jacksonville to start five COVID-19 research projects

UF Health Jacksonville to start five COVID-19 research projects
UF Health Jacksonville

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. — UF Health Jacksonville is actively enrolling patients in COVID-19 research studies to help researchers and clinicians to understand and target treatment options for COVID-19.

Two of the studies are clinical trials looking at potential medications effective in treating patients with COVID-19. One study is looking at losartan, an antihypertensive medication, and a placebo. According to the press release, the trial specifically seeks to identify improvements in patients with COVID-19 who are experiencing respiratory failure.

The second clinical trial would look at a combination of interferon beta-1a, an anti-inflammatory medication commonly used to treat multiple sclerosis, and remdesivir, an antiviral medication, compared with remdesivir alone.

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A third study would test a new COVID-19 rapid test called BinaxNOW. The UF Health Jacksonville campus will be the first enrolling site in Florida testing this new rapid test.

The fourth study would be an immunophenotyping assessment. This means that researchers will be studying how patients immune system changes throughout the course of a COVID-19 infection. They will be looking a patients from Gainesville, Tampa, and Jacksonville. This research will be done by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases.

The last study will involve the Indiana University COVID-19 Registry and information on patients, containment, and care escalation efforts. This registry is key to help share clinical data to help future patients.

“Our team of emergency medicine physicians engaged in COVID-19 studies exemplifies the spirit of our division and our commitment to contributing to the greater good of the medical community,” said Dr. Phyllis Hendry, the associate chair of emergency medicine research at UF Health Jacksonville. “Our entire research team and campus have worked tirelessly to bring COVID-19-related studies on board in a rapid manner. We could not do this without our research coordinators and the support of emergency medicine nursing leadership.”